Site-wide links

Hours of Operation

Monday–Friday
9 a.m.–12 p.m., 1 p.m.–5 p.m.

Saturday–Sunday
Closed

Other times by appointment.

Image File: 
Caption: 

Howard N. King, (–)

Goudy Award Winner 10, 1978

Howard N. King is a printer with over half a century of practical experience in the field of typography, with particular emphasis on the design of books.

He became interested in book design as early as 1929, when the founder of the Maple Press Company commissioned him to design a yearbook for the Country Club of York. Since that time he has produced many trade books. Even in retirement he presently finds the time to plan the format of over a dozen. medical textbooks each year. However, he has always considered that his greatest challenge as a book designer has been the Christmas keepsake volumes for Maple Press and numerous privately printed books. Many of them are presently on display in the Melbert B. Cary, Jr. Library

In 1938 he enrolled in a correspondence course with the American Academy of Arts in Chicago. While taking this course he designed several books for McGraw-Hill, including Life Begins at Forty, Chicken Every Sunday, and Dickens Digest.

In 1940 he became Typographic Consultant to the Intertype Company of Brooklyn, New York. He served this company for 30 years, where he designed many of their advertising pieces and was responsible for introducing two. typefaces in this country-Weiss and Walbaum (known in its Intertype re; cutting as Waverley). Under Intertype's supervision he was responsible for introducing all-day workshops for newspapers which he conducted in 49 of the 50 states. He is credited with changing the formats of many newspapers in this country. In addition he lectured Widely on typography.

In 1952 he was elected President of the International Club of Printing House Craftsmen, followed in 1953 by receipt of its annual award as Outstanding Craftsman of the Year. During this period he championed the new concept of phototypesetting, now such a prominent factor in graphic arts technology.

He further demonstrated his faith in photographic applications to typography by helping to organize York Graphic Services, today one of the largest firms of its kind, which he still serves as vice president.

He is a member of ths American Institute of Graphic Arts, the Chicago Society of Typographic Arts, and the York Club of Printing House Craftsmen.