The Stories They Tell 3

In 2015 archives across the United States shared examples from their collections that specifically give voice to people who have a unique, surprising or compelling story to tell. For the third year in a row, the archives will partner with students in Dr. Juilee Decker's Cultural Informatics to develop engaging exhibits for the RIT community and virtually for all of you.

 

 

The Stories They Tell 4

This exhibit, cultivated from the RIT Archive Collections and the RIT/NTID Deaf Studies Archive, seeks to share stories of the RIT community through documents, photographs, yearbooks, memorabilia, and other items. The exhibition is the product of a museum studies course Cultural Informatics (MUSE 359), which fosters an annual collaboration between the Museum Studies Program and the RIT Archives to curate from the collections. Under the direction of Associate Professor Juilee Decker and Associate Archivist, Jody Sidlauskas, the following students created the display on view on the first floor of The Wallace Center: Taylor Carpenter, Amber DeStevens, Cameron Forbes, Linzie Fuechtmann, Kate MacLaren, and Patrick Toy. Each student researched, selected, and designed one of the exhibit cases you see here as part of the third such collaboration between Museum Studies and the Archives. For more information on the process of creating this exhibition, see https://ritmuse.wordpress.com/. We hope you enjoy learning about the items on view and the stories they tell.

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

RIT was selected to be the sight of the newly established National Technical Institute for the Deaf...

SpiRIT the Tiger

RIT Archives is celebrating the year of our Tiger - 1963/64 when the live tiger mascot came to RIT 50 years ago.

This exhibit features one of RIT's most unique stories, that of SpiRIT the Bengal tiger. Students wanted a live tiger to represent their tiger pride.  Unfortunately, a live Bengal cub grows very rapidly so in no time SpiRIT was more than they bargained for. SpiRIT was loved dearly by the students and is still talked about by alumni when they return to the RIT campus today. Here is a glimpse at RIT's beloved "house cat."

NTID Dedication

In 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law the National Technical Institute for the Deaf Act and the search for a permanent site to host a new NTID was soon underway. On November 14, 1966, Representative Hugh Carey officially announced the selection of RIT as the site for NTID; the subsequent years were to be of vital importance for the establishment of the new campus.  

Throughout the next several years, NTID and RIT worked tirelessly to provide education and training that would change employment outlook for deaf graduates. Although the final building designations would not be until 1979, the Dedication ceremony of the NTID Facilities in October,1974 marked an important milestone; the Dedication is still considered one of the most memorable events in the institute’s history.

Liz Dopp Collection on RIT Women's Hockey

Born in Manlius, NY, Liz Dopp came to RIT in 1979 to study business administration and to play hockey. During her four years of play, she served as assistant captain during the 1982-1983 season. However, during her junior year, Liz and her fellow teammates (and their parents) took RIT to task regarding the marginalization of female athletes and teams, specifically the women’s hockey team.

 

Skating through the decades of men's hockey at RIT

RIT’s hockey program began as a club team in the fall of 1959.  In 1962, the team became part of the Finger Lakes Collegiate Hockey League. Three years later in 1965, men’s ice hockey became an official varsity sport.  Since then, the team has played in Division III and Division II and most recently in 2005, the Tigers moved up to the elite Division I level and joined the Atlantic Hockey Association.

This website is the digital version of the exhibit that ran from October 2011 through March 2012 in the RIT Museum featuring five decades of photographs and memorabilia found in the RIT Archive Collections. The exhibit was greatly enhanced by donations from hockey alumni who generously loaned their jerseys, equipment, scrapbooks, and the memories they still hold of playing hockey at RIT. Included is a history of the famous RIT Corner Crew established in the 1980’s as ardent hockey supporters making their presence known at every game.

Use the Contact Us button above to let us know what you think of the exhibit. Thanks!

The Stories They Tell

In 2015 archives across the United States are sharing examples from their collections that specifically give voice to people who have a unique, surprising or compelling story to tell. RIT Archive Collections, encompassing the RIT Archives, The University Art Collection and the RIT/NTID Deaf Studies Archive, exists to document the history of the university but what is RIT’s history if not the stories of all the individuals who have worked and studied here? This exhibit taps into the collections to display records that reveal this human side of RIT’s history. We hope you enjoy the diversity of voices.

Robert Bagby Photographs and Other Material
A success in his field, Robert C. Bagby (1896-1972) traveled around the world helping to shoot advertisements for various companies and organizations. Awarded the title of "Fellow" in the Royal Photographic Society of Great Britain in 1948, by 1953, he closed his firm in New York City and accepted a position at RIT in the university's School of Photography. To our twenty-first-century eyes, Bagby's photography seems to reveal much about the society, culture, and stereotypes of our Western world in regard to the "other."

Spirited: Cheers to RIT School Spirit

School spirit is the enthusiastic expression of support for an academic institution, commonly expressed through school colors, mascots, sports teams, and songs. This exhibit traces the fascinating history of how school spirit was expressed, from the earliest days of the Mechanics Institute to today by RIT students, faculty, staff, and alumni. Through vintage photographs, archival documents, and memorabilia from the RIT Archive Collections as well as personal collections, it examines the ways in which school spirit was initiated by students, faculty, and staff of RIT eager to demonstrate their pride.

This exhibition has been a long time in the making. The idea first emerged as a hypothetical display proposed by Jennifer Roeszies and Lisa Witt, museum studies majors, and employees of The Wallace Center, as a project for a museum studies course taught by Professor Rebecca DeRoo during the 2015-16 school year. Two years later, in the fall 2017, the idea was brought to fruition as part of another course, Cultural Informatics (MUSE 359) taught by Professor Juilee Decker, which fosters an annual collaboration between the Museum Studies Program and the RIT Archives to curate from the collections.

Under the direction of Decker and Associate Archivist, Jody Sidlauskas, the following students created the display on view here: Lizzy Carr, Mitchell Cartner, Dante Edgar, Kaye Knoll, Daniel Krull, Elisha Muir, Seth Newburgh, Jen Roeszies, and Anna Vernacchio. Each student researched, selected, and designed one of the nine exhibit cases you see here. In the process of bringing the hypothetical into the actual, the exhibition plan was constrained in some areas and expanded in others—a process that speaks to the iterative work of curation.

For more information on the process of creating this exhibition, see https://ritmuse.wordpress.com/.