Collection on Douglas Lyttle

RIT Archives

Table of Contents

Collection Overview
Biographical Information for Douglas Lyttle
Scope and Content
Arrangement
Subject Headings
Information for Researchers
Administrative Information
Related Materials

Collection Overview (Collapse)

Title
Collection on Douglas Lyttle
Creator
Lyttle, Douglas A.
Inclusive Date(s)
1967-1984
Abstract
Materials related to Douglas Lyttle, a former professor of photography at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT). The collection includes articles written by Lyttle, a title list of works written by Lyttle, clippings, and an invitation.
Extent
1.0 Folder(s)
Location
C.S. South Shelf 816, Box 28
Repository
RIT Archive Collections
RIT Libraries
Wallace Center
90 Lomb Memorial Drive
Rochester, New York, 14623
(585) 475-2557
raswml@rit.edu
Language
English

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Biographical Information for Douglas Lyttle (Collapse)

Douglas A. Lyttle (1919- ) began his career as a research chemist before switching to photography. He graduated from the University of Michigan in 1941 with a degree in chemistry. Upon graduating, he worked for Merck & Co. before joining the Upjohn Company, a pharmaceutical manufacturer in Kalamazoo, Michigan. While working at these companies, Lyttle conducted research in a variety of areas including vitamins and steroids. Then, in 1961 he left the chemistry field to pursue a career in photography.

Lyttle started his career transition by opening his own studio where he focused on portraiture and architectural photography. In 1969, Lyttle accepted a faculty position in the Rochester Institute of Technology's (RIT) College of Graphic Arts and Photography. He had been awarded a Master of Photography degree by the Professional Photographers of America in 1966 and was granted the title of Photographic Craftsman by the organization in 1970. The latter designation was based on his performance as well as service to the profession. Additionally, Lyttle belonged to the American Society of Photographers and the Royal Photographic Society of Great Britain. He retired from RIT in 1983 and was offered a position as a professor emeritus at the university.

In 1972, Lyttle traveled to Greece for the first time. Wanting to capture images of a non-western culture, he began photographing the Greek Monastic Republic of Mt. Athos, an area that was home to many Eastern Orthodox monasteries. During his 22 trips to the region between 1972 and 1998, Lyttle captured over 50,000 images and developed a respectful relationship with the area's inhabitants. As a result of his time spent there, he decided to convert to Orthodoxy in 1997 and took the name Douglas Demetrios Lyttle. His photographs were published in a book, Miracle on the Monastery Mountain, in 2002.

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Scope and Content (Collapse)

The Collection on Douglas Lyttle consists of items related to Lyttle and his professional career. The collection includes articles written by Lyttle from as early as 1967; faculty information sheets with lists of writings, exhibits, and awards related to Lyttle; an invitation to a presentation given by Lyttle titled "Maria of Koukouli, a Love Story"; and clippings.

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Arrangement (Collapse)

The collection is arranged chronologically.

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Subject Headings (Collapse)

Personal Name(s)

  • Lyttle, Douglas A.

Corporate Name(s)

  • Rochester Institute of Technology. College of Graphic Arts and Photography.
  • Rochester Institute of Technology. School of Photographic Arts and Sciences.

Subject(s)

  • Photographers -- New York (State) -- Rochester
  • Photography -- Study and teaching -- New York (State) -- Rochester

Genre(s)

  • Articles
  • Clippings (information artifacts)
  • Invitations

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Information for Researchers (Collapse)

Preferred Citation

Collection on Douglas Lyttle, RIT Archive Collections

Restrictions on Access

This collection is open to researchers.

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Administrative Information (Collapse)

Collection ID

RITArc.0155

Processing Information

Finding aid created by Lara Nicosia in April 2011.

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Related Materials (Collapse)

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