Format: 

Name of the Court. Title of Case. Title of Reporter, volume, Publisher, Year, Page(s). Database Name or Title of Non-Publisher Website, DOI or URL. Accessed Day Month Year.

Name of the Court. Title of Case. Title of Reporter, volume, Publisher, Year, Page(s).

Examples: 

United States District Court, Western District of New York. New York State Rifle and Pistol Association v. Cuomo. Federal Supplement, Second Series, vol. 990, 2013, pp. 349+. WestlawNext Campus Research, 1-next-westlaw-com.ezproxy.rit.edu/Search/Home.html?rs=IWLN1.0&vr=3.0&sp=003054105-2100&forcecdn=false&bhskip=1. Accessed 12 Dec. 2017.

In-text: (US District Court, Western District of NY)

Supreme Court of the United States. Town of Greece v. Galloway. Supreme Court Reporter, vol. 134, Thomson West, 2014, pp. 1811+. Google Scholar, scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=3753205298956949348. Accessed 12 Dec. 2017.

In-text: (Supreme Court of the US 1820)

Notes: 

Court cases are not explicitly covered by the MLA Handbook. The formats listed above are based on the format for multivolume works (MLA 39) since court cases are typically published in multivolume court reporters. It is recommended that you check with your instructor to determine how to cite court documents as another style (e.g. Bluebook or Chicago Manual of Style) may provide a more appropriate format. If you do not know the end page for a court case, use only the first number followed by a plus sign (MLA 110). If you cannot find exact page numbers for the court case, omit them from the in-text citation; you should still be able to find the start page based on the reporter citation for the Works Cited reference (MLA 56). You should also provide a direct URL and access date for the item, but omit the http:// or https:// (MLA 53; 110). WestlawNext does not provide permalinks for cases; when using WestlawNext, link to the database as a whole instead (see first example).

Source:

This source type is not covered by the MLA Handbook (8th ed.)