Henrietta Campus Construction

In April 1959, New York State Department of Public Works informed RIT it was ninety-nine percent sure that it would need to construct an inner loop to connect to the New York State Thruway which would cut right through the middle of the downtown campus. This would lead to the destruction of the Eastman Building, one of the main academic buildings on campus.

Liz Dopp Collection on RIT Women's Hockey

Born in Manlius, NY, Liz Dopp came to RIT in 1979 to study business administration and to play hockey. During her four years of play, she served as assistant captain during the 1982-1983 season. However, during her junior year, Liz and her fellow teammates (and their parents) took RIT to task regarding the marginalization of female athletes and teams, specifically the women’s hockey team.

 

The Stories They Tell 2

During the Fall 2015, Museum Studies students from the College of Liberal Arts worked with RIT’s Archivist, Becky Simmons, and Associate Archivist, Jody Sidlauskas, to curate a second exhibition on the theme "The Stories They Tell." Over five weeks, students in Dr. Juilee Decker's Cultural Informatics course examined the collections, selected items, wrote exhibit labels, installed the works, and prepared an online exhibition. We hope you enjoy The Stories They Tell 2.

 

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

RIT was selected to be the sight of the newly established National Technical Institute for the Deaf...

Robert Bagby Photographs and Other Material
A success in his field, Robert C. Bagby (1896-1972) traveled around the world helping to shoot advertisements for various companies and organizations. Awarded the title of "Fellow" in the Royal Photographic Society of Great Britain in 1948, by 1953, he closed his firm in New York City and accepted a position at RIT in the university's School of Photography. To our twenty-first-century eyes, Bagby's photography seems to reveal much about the society, culture, and stereotypes of our Western world in regard to the "other."

Barbi Brill Photographic Printing Lab Book
Barbara "Barbi" Brill graduated as the only female photography major of her class in 1957. On exhibit is her first year photography assignment booklet which offers a glimpse into her life and her photography education at RIT. The techniques, assignments, and results create interesting comparisons to today’s photography education. The rigorous grading and assignments tested the first year students, much like classes do today. Having a look into Brill’s educational experience is gratifying and also informative to current RIT photography students.

SpiRIT the Tiger

RIT Archives is celebrating the year of our Tiger - 1963/64 when the live tiger mascot came to RIT 50 years ago.

This exhibit features one of RIT's most unique stories, that of SpiRIT the Bengal tiger. Students wanted a live tiger to represent their tiger pride.  Unfortunately, a live Bengal cub grows very rapidly so in no time SpiRIT was more than they bargained for. SpiRIT was loved dearly by the students and is still talked about by alumni when they return to the RIT campus today. Here is a glimpse at RIT's beloved "house cat."

The Stories They Tell 3

In 2015 archives across the United States shared examples from their collections that specifically give voice to people who have a unique, surprising or compelling story to tell. For the third year in a row, the archives will partner with students in Dr. Juilee Decker's Cultural Informatics to develop engaging exhibits for the RIT community and virtually for all of you.

 

 

Mary Anne Cross-Ehasz Collection

Mary Anne Cross was an Art and Design student at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Her design skill was acknowledged by RIT’s adoption of her logo design for the university’s official seal from 1956 to 1966. In fact, it was Mary Anne who first utilized the dots between the three letters in the acronym RIT. Even though the university changed logos again in 1966, Mary Anne’s influence on the aesthetics of the logo remain. Just take a peek at the seal she created in this exhibit to see the similarities with our present day logo.

 

Spirited: Cheers to RIT School Spirit

School spirit is the enthusiastic expression of support for an academic institution, commonly expressed through school colors, mascots, sports teams, and songs. This exhibit traces the fascinating history of how school spirit was expressed, from the earliest days of the Mechanics Institute to today by RIT students, faculty, staff, and alumni. Through vintage photographs, archival documents, and memorabilia from the RIT Archive Collections as well as personal collections, it examines the ways in which school spirit was initiated by students, faculty, and staff of RIT eager to demonstrate their pride.

This exhibition has been a long time in the making. The idea first emerged as a hypothetical display proposed by Jennifer Roeszies and Lisa Witt, museum studies majors, and employees of The Wallace Center, as a project for a museum studies course taught by Professor Rebecca DeRoo during the 2015-16 school year. Two years later, in the fall 2017, the idea was brought to fruition as part of another course, Cultural Informatics (MUSE 359) taught by Professor Juilee Decker, which fosters an annual collaboration between the Museum Studies Program and the RIT Archives to curate from the collections.

Under the direction of Decker and Associate Archivist, Jody Sidlauskas, the following students created the display on view here: Lizzy Carr, Mitchell Cartner, Dante Edgar, Kaye Knoll, Daniel Krull, Elisha Muir, Seth Newburgh, Jen Roeszies, and Anna Vernacchio. Each student researched, selected, and designed one of the nine exhibit cases you see here. In the process of bringing the hypothetical into the actual, the exhibition plan was constrained in some areas and expanded in others—a process that speaks to the iterative work of curation.

For more information on the process of creating this exhibition, see https://ritmuse.wordpress.com/.